• East Oahu News - Friday Update 03/03/2017

    March 2 - A visitor from South Carolina was rescued from high surf at China Walls in the Portlock area.  After receiving medical attention, he was transported to a local hospital. [Star-Advertiser]

    March 1 - Heavy rains and strong winds forced closures throughout Oahu, including at Hawaii Kai Satellite City Hall, where power was temporarily out. [HNN]

    March 1 - Police are investigating the death of a 34 year-old man found dead in his car in Waimanalo.  His body was discovered February 28.  There were no signs of foul play. [Star-Advertiser]

    February 26 - The fire department rescued an injured 22 year-old spear fisherman from Spitting Caves.  He had fallen 15 feet onto the ledge below.  [KITV]

  • What should sustainable agriculture look like in Hawaii?

    Senate bill 1313 seeks to require an additional 10 percent of our food be locally sourced.  It's the brainchild of Senator Brickwood Galuteria, whom argues that our state's reliance on food imports imperils residents' safety in times of need.  Granted, with more than 50 percent of our produce and 90 percent of our beef coming from outside the state, we are unique in our reliance of food imports.

    But, is this the solution for a real-estate-poor metropolis?  Hawaii's population density consistently ranks in the top quartile of states, and kamaaina's biggest complaint is that children can't stay here after college because there is no affordable housing.

    Hawaii Kai prides itself on having farms smack dab in the middle of the suburb.  Me, I'm not a fan.  Then again, I live right in front of one of the farms.  While I enjoy fertile topsoil, I enjoy it much less thrown by tractors onto my windowpanes on a frequent basis.  Truth is, even those farmers are struggling.  They lease their land from Bishop Estate, which is in turn unable to do anything else with the land because of a public perception of "sustainability."  The farmers also have difficulty finding workers to plow and harvest.  A few innovative ones have turned to "farm tours" to extract voluntary help.

    Farms in the suburb are all around just a bad idea: a bad fit and an ill use of space.

    No one likes a negative view without a positive alternative.  That is why I would propose that Hawaii make a plan for microfarms.  They really are the wave of the future.  They can be placed in garages, rooftops and wherever there is available room.  Granted, you can't raise cows there.  (Given that the Hawaii Farm Bureau has only given its blessing to this bill if all agriculture is included -- like flowers -- I seriously doubt this bill is truly serious about food sustainability anyhow.) But you can raise the most expensive types of greens: those that are easy and quick to grow but have limited shelf life once picked.

    Aquaponics lettuceAs it turns out, I've been experimenting with produce sustainability and I think I've reached a pretty good balance.  To get a good idea of what can be accomplished, visit The Aquaponics Place in Waimanalo.  They have an incredible selection of both components and turnkey systems -- and at a good price too.  Hawaii Kai residents only need to drive 10 minutes to get there.  It's on Lukanela Street right behind the feed store off of Mekia Street and Kalanianaole Highway.

    So far, I've purchased rockwool and large tubs from them.  They were even kind enough to drill a hole in one of the tubs for me.  I'll post an article about it and my low-maintenance low-cost hydroponic system in the near future.

    It seems to me that suburbanites really aren't into gardening. Truthfully, it's a heartbreaking experience.  You toil and till and once the seedlings are looking good, the slugs and snails eat them.  Hydroponics and indoor gardening take the pain out of the gardening.  It also removes the weeding.  And, even in tight spaces, we can find room.  So, Senator Galuteria, if you're listening, I'm not disagreeing that sustainability is a good asset.  I'm just questioning whether a quota on growing and a reliance on old farming methods is the solution.  I also think the Hawaii Farm Bureau's stance on including all agriculture detracts from the overall purpose of the bill.  As a matter of fact, if I were starving, a vaseful of proteas wouldn't console me.

    For more on the subject and the inspiration for this post, reference this 2/27 Pacific News article.

  • TRAFFIC: Ainakoa - Kalaniana'ole Hwy Water Main Break

    THIS POST WILL BE UPDATED AS NEW INFORMATION ARISES:

    Follow Nixle for the latest governmental updates, or check in with my Twitter feed /1 for the latest information.

    ************************************************************************************

    Good news ! 

      3:48 PM - 24 Jan 2017

    All Kalanianaole Hwy EB lanes expected to be open by noon Wednesday,

    Even Better News !

    Before 5am Wednesday, all lanes to Hawaii Kai have been reopened.

    ************************************************************************************ 

    On Saturday, January 21, 2017 at about 4:45 a.m., a 24-inch water main break occurred before the intersection of Kalanianaole Highway and Ainakoa drive: near the end of the H-1 freeway.  From approximately 6:00 am, Kalananaole Highway Eastbound (EB) was closed on Saturday.  At approximately 11pm, one lane was reopened.  The lane remained open throughout Sunday.

    One lane remains open EB.  The Board of Water Supply (BWS) along with cooperating agencies, opens two lanes for the afternoon commute when it is safe to do so.  On Monday at approximately 3pm, a second lane was opened for the evening commute.

    The removal of a defunct water main above the present one is causing additional delays to the repair, and BWS now estimates that it will take until Thursday, January 26 to completely restore transit to the East Oahu area.  Residents are advised to minimize travel through the area if possible.  Until the repair is completed, all other scheduled roadwork for East Oahu through Waimanalo is postponed.

    1/ for document citation and verification, see Twitter feed and official retweets

  • East Oahu News - Friday Update 10/21/2016

    October 20, 2016 - Oceanic Cable advises East Oahu residents of potential disrupted services on the following days:

    Thursday, 27 October 2016| 12:00 AM – 05:00 AM
    On Oahu, in Kaneohe, Kailua, Waimanalo, Kalama, Hawaii Kai and surrounding areas, video services, including but not limited to Video On Demand, Look Back, Start Over services, may be intermittent or briefly unavailable due to network maintenance.
    Thursday, 27 October 2016 | 12:00 AM – 05:00 AM
    On Oahu, in Downtown Honolulu, Kakaako, Moiliili, Makiki, Manoa, Waikiki, Kaimuki, Diamond Head, Kahala, Kalani, Niu Valley and surrounding areas, video services, including but not limited to Video On Demand, Look Back, Start Over services, may be intermittent or briefly unavailable due to network maintenance.

    Other Statewide upgrades are scheduled for: 10/24, 10/26, 10/27 and 10/28 [Oceanic Cable]

    October 20, 2016 - On Hiki No, Episode #804, Students at Kalani High School in East O‘ahu demonstrate how to make a thaumatrope – a simple device made from paper and string that creates rudimentary forms of animation. [PBS]

    October 19, 2016 - Koko Crater Stables to reopen October 28 [Midweek]

    October 19, 2016 - The Hawaii State Department of Health (DOH) has confirmed an additional case of hepatitis A in an Oahu food service worker. The infected case is an employee at McDonald’s of Kahala, located at 4618 Kilauea Avenue in Honolulu. Affected dates of service are Sept. 20–21, 23–24, 27–29, and Oct. 1, 4–5, 7, and 11, 2016. [Damon Tucker]

    October 15, 2016 - Ground has broken on Kaikaina, a new Department of Hawaiian Homelands project in Waimanalo.  Thirty-one new units are being built. [KHON]